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Monthly Archives: January 2013

The Free Encyclopedia

// Posted by Celia on 01/31/2013 (11:03 AM)

Growing up, the “Encyclopedia” was an extensive set of 20 or so books that lined our family bookshelf in alphabetical order. I could look up basically anything I wanted and find at least a paragraph about the topic. The books… Read more

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Growing up, the “Encyclopedia” was an extensive set of 20 or so books that lined our family bookshelf in alphabetical order. I could look up basically anything I wanted and find at least a paragraph about the topic. The books were easy to use and exciting. I loved projects that required me to look things up.

Enter 2001 and the “Encyclopedia” now had a new definition: Wikipedia. It started with an idea and 100 volunteers on a mission to create thousands of entries about pretty much anything. The pages also included the option to edit now, giving all users the option to contribute to the existing information. The concept challenged human interaction in a public forum; the pages were supposed to maintain unbiased and just communicate the facts. The pages were constantly changing, for better or for worse. Wikipedia.com was the first fluid Encyclopedia. Then, it became the Free Encyclopedia.

The evolution of the Wikipedia logo ^^ (from Wikipedia.com)

The creation of Wikipedia strikes me as similar to Stewart Brand’s Whole Earth Catalog  whereby it represented a collection of various tools, items, and products compiled in a manner to appeal to the “New Communalists” and the “cowboys and nomads.” Both Wikipedia and the Whole Earth Catalog strike me as conglomerations of products and theories of their decades. Brand’s Catalog offered new ways to approach the computer. Wikipedia embodies an example of a fresh approach to personal computing, communal knowledge, and social forums.

An article in the New York Times published Septemeber 20, 2001 was used for the factual pieces of this post. The article can be found here.


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The Girl Who Cried “Fire”

// Posted by Celia on 01/28/2013 (10:27 PM)

This weekend, a terrible fire occurred in a Brazilian nightclub called “Kiss.” The club was filled far beyond its capacity, which lead to further chaos when the fire broke out. It spread faster and was difficult to contain. Over 230… Read more

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This weekend, a terrible fire occurred in a Brazilian nightclub called “Kiss.” The club was filled far beyond its capacity, which lead to further chaos when the fire broke out. It spread faster and was difficult to contain. Over 230 people were killed and the scene described in related articles is disturbing and tragic. Could the fire have been saved by social media?

The Huffington Post published an article about a 20 year old in the club who posted a Facebook status within an hour of the disaster. The post read “Incéndio na KISS socorro,” which translates to “Fire at KISS help.” The post received many comments, including one that said “the last check-in.” The girl who posted the status died in the fire, alongside hundreds of others. The fire appears to have been started as a result of pyrotechnics used in the band’s performance.

Another article in the Huffington Post about the incident says that the band that performed on this night feels threatened through social media sights.  People have been making claims that they will have to pay and the band fears retaliation.

In this instance, we see social media for good and for bad. Well, the victim’s post could have been better if her Facebook friends had perhaps reacted in a more urgent matter. Does this stem from that people make over-dramatic statuses? Then there is the flip side, that the band is now receiving threats through social media outlets. How will they keep themselves safe when (probably) all their activity is live-posted and geo-tagged thanks to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Foursquare…

I find the situation simultaneously hopeful but discouraging. Social media is such a powerful tool, even has the power to save lives; in the physical and the metaphorical sense (think about FB campaigns that raise money). That being said, so often it is used for harm or for scheming. It’s so vast and basically impossible to control. If people could learn to harness the positive potential of social media outlets, the internet could become a less threatening space. What if you could tweet @911 (or the equivalent emergency hotline) and get a call or help immediately? Or text your location to a “HELP” line if you are in a situation and unable to make a phone call, i.e. a crowded club or the back of a kidnap van? The possibilities are there.

Facebook Post

Brazilian Nightclub Fire


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i…Potty?

// Posted by Sam on 01/28/2013 (12:10 AM)

 

Well, the world might finally be coming to an end. I can guarantee you that John Perry Barlow and William Gibson did not expect “cyberspace” to be accessible from the toilet. “The free-lancers and n’er do wells” who,… Read more

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Well, the world might finally be coming to an end. I can guarantee you that John Perry Barlow and William Gibson did not expect “cyberspace” to be accessible from the toilet. “The free-lancers and n’er do wells” who, according to Barlow, “found their home in cyberspace,” as it turns out have a new demographic joining them: toddlers. The iPotty, a new product developed and introduced at the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show is as horrifying as it is self-explanatory. The Huffington Post describes the new product in their article here.

 

Anyone can appreciate a good newspaper or magazine in the old WC; hell, even iPhones give us our now standard 5-minute doses of entertainment.

Besides the fact that I’m starting to resent all the new products that are coming out with the “i” designation (by the way, what does that even mean? What’s next, iCereal? iToothbrushes? It’s a joke), the iPotty and its implications are remarkably annoying on their own. I’m sorry CTA digital, but this is a bright plastic piece of garbage. Is there really a need to teach toddlers how to use an iPad before they can use a toilet on their own? Are technological skills becoming as important as ditching diapers for the first time?
And even if I’m being overly critical of the implications that may or may not be associated with this joke of a product, how much time are toddlers even spending on the potty? Yes, I learned my fair share of computer skills in kindergarten when floppy disks reigned supreme and we played “Oregon Trail.” Yes, I think that iPads can be a valuable source of education for youngsters. And yes, Fred Turner has documented rather extensively the transformation from technology as a counter-culture to a so-called “cyberculture.” It worries me, though, that maybe this new iCulture is actually turning away from the dominant position that it once commanded and is beginning to become a new counter-culture? If I saw the iPotty in a child’s room, I would certainly raise some questions about the parenting.  Call me old-fashioned, but I just don’t see a parent plopping their child down on an automated toiled showing a video of how to use the potty as being tantamount to actually teaching their child how to do something on their own. Is this newly emerging radical iCulture going to become the proverbial Tea Party of Apple, Inc.?

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Money For Nothing

// Posted by Andrew on 01/27/2013 (10:33 PM)

“You break into any system that you are not authorized to enter, you should be willing and able to face the consequences. The Age of the Merry Pranksters and a Bus going Further are long gone. I loved it then… Read more

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“You break into any system that you are not authorized to enter, you should be willing and able to face the consequences. The Age of the Merry Pranksters and a Bus going Further are long gone. I loved it then but this time is not then. Too many scammers and info-terrorists are running rampant so Hacker Beware.”

That is an individual’s comment on a New York Times article concerning the Aaron Swartz situation. In his eyes, Swartz illegally downloaded millions of copy-written files and was completely responsible for his actions. This is certainly a valid point; after all, the documents WERE held on a secure subscription-only server, and he TECHNICALLY broke the law. However, are today’s piracy and copyright laws outdated and incapable of properly policing online illegal activity? After all, Swartz’s potential punishment was “35 years and $1 million in fines,” a punishment rivaling that of armed robbers and individuals who commit dangerous, face-to-face crimes.

Although JSTOR opted to not press charges against Swartz, other organizations have taken ineffective and costly approaches to “punish” those who have illegally downloaded products online. The RIAA is notorious for suing people of all ages (as in, from children and the elderly) for thousands of dollars per illegally downloaded song. In this article research shows that out of $64 million spent on lawsuit campaigns, they only brought in about $1.4 million in settlement money. That’s only 2% of the money they spent that they’re getting back.

I’ve done a ton of research on copyright laws and the media in the past, and from my research I’ve concluded that today’s laws are inadequate in the face of the vast amount of technological changes that have occurred since they were written. For example, is it illegal for an individual to buy a game or a movie legally and then pirate the same copy just so that he or she can get around the pesky always-stay-online” DRM included in the paid version? That’s what happened to Shawn Hogan, who was sued after illegally downloading the movie Meet The Fockers via BitTorrent. His case was unique because he provided evidence that he owned a legitimate copy of the DVD, and the case was settled.

I am not an opponent to strict copyright laws. After all, people deserve to be paid for their work. However, I think that the laws need to be revamped, thrown away, or replaced in order to accomodate a world in which law-abiding people are being sued for thousands of dollars for “illegal” activities that, under scrutiny, aren’t worth the pain and suffering that they cause. If someone wants to both buy a copy of Diablo 3 and a pirated version just to play the pirated copy offline, who are they actually hurting? If Aaron Swartz takes JSTOR articles and posts them for others to read, should he be imprisoned for 35 years? Where does it END?

By: Andrew Jones


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Job Hunt

// Posted by Jorien on 01/27/2013 (10:33 AM)

Getting closer to being done with university, anxieties may arise. Especially the dreaded hunt for a job. Did you have the right education? Do you have all the skills needed?  and most of all, What… Read more

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Getting closer to being done with university, anxieties may arise. Especially the dreaded hunt for a job. Did you have the right education? Do you have all the skills needed?  and most of all, What do you want to do the rest of your life?
It makes it even harder when you have to start looking in your last semester, you are busy with your last courses and doing the last fun activities as a student, you do not want to search for a job.  However, there will be a point you have to start looking, how will you do that?

When someone wanted a job, they would search in papers and send in their resumes. Often you had to go out and ask around if there was a job available. However, with the new digital age it is easy to look for jobs online and just email the resume. Also, there are different companies now: software companies, internet companies etc.. Instead of going out of your house one can just stay inside and search from behind their desks.

Even though it is easy to search from within your place, people still need incentives to look for jobs, whether it is a good salary, the location, people who work there or just the idea of giving back to the community. Everyone needs to be able to provide for themselves and find a job that suits their interests best. However, I found an article online that said that people’s incentives are not the only thing that matter. Companies compete for different employees and to make their company more appealing there are different tactics used in order to make people want to apply at that place.

Reading the article on Wired, it seemed that nowadays people are more eager to work for a company who makes the workplace look fun. With free food and video games the application process is more appealing and might attract more people than with the traditional tactics.

[ the new workplace?] 

Did this change because of the new options technologically,  or do people need more incentives nowadays in order to get them to work for a company?  Should work be fun, or is it enough if it provides the family with a house and food?

Personally, I think the main reason that people work is so that they are independent and can make a living. Now that there are so many options to make a job application different than others, it does make it more interesting if the company uses all those resources. Maybe free food is not really a good reason you want to work there, but all the little extras make it more fun. A puzzle to show your different capabilities is an interesting way of applying, especially since it is a data company. I think the companies should have an application process linked to their company, so people will are more interested in applying and so they know which potential skills are needed.

  


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Reinventing Your Memory

// Posted by Celia on 01/24/2013 (11:50 AM)

Looking at digital media and social networking today, it seems like human memory is almost unnecessary at times. Facebook remembers what day and year every photo was taken, and can usually even tell you where you were at the time.… Read more

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Looking at digital media and social networking today, it seems like human memory is almost unnecessary at times. Facebook remembers what day and year every photo was taken, and can usually even tell you where you were at the time. iPhones and other camera-phones have replaced (in many cases) the conventional disposable or digital camera, making it easier to document every moment. The need for post-its feels like its even decreasing, since now you can just take a picture to remember. With the technological advances, many human memories are accompanied by a picture, video, text message, or email to ensure you do not forget them. Forget what time you have a meeting next week? Not to worry, your phone will probably send you a reminder to make sure you don’t have to do any remembering (assuming you utilize your calendar function). “A Sense of Place,” an article in the February issue of Wired magazine, outlines the differences between retrospective and prospective memory. Retrospective memory deals more with the memorization of facts from the past, such as a peers names or hometowns. Prospective memory is trickier because it represents tasks, as exemplified by the calendar reminders that are necessary for some people to avoid slip-ups. Google is now searching for a way to further aid people in remembering the tasks that always seem to slip away until its too late. The tools that exist now are hardly perfect, based on GPS data that is not always accurate enough. The article “A Sense of Place” mentions that there is hope for a system that can remind you to remember your keys or have a “floating message” waiting outside the office telling you to go to the supermarket.

The idea of this seems somewhat surreal; in the way that conventional responsibility would be altered. If you forgot a meeting because there was no reminder, would it be your fault or the program’s fault? I would go as far as to say it almost adds another level of accountability whereby you have to ensure the system is running at 100% all the time. Unless someone reveals that the human memory is physically overextended, impairing ones ability to remember more, I think conventional memory and sticky notes is still the best method for making it anywhere.


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A Case For A Faceless Internet

// Posted by Andrew on 01/20/2013 (9:24 PM)

Internet anonymity is very important to me. If I have an awkward question, I want to ask a group of like-minded people on Reddit under a pseudonym like “LaxPlayer22″ and not under my real name. It’s simply a privacy issue.… Read more

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Internet anonymity is very important to me. If I have an awkward question, I want to ask a group of like-minded people on Reddit under a pseudonym like “LaxPlayer22″ and not under my real name. It’s simply a privacy issue.

Recently, Google has been working towards a complete removal of any kinds of anonymity with their products, which started with Google+ and the inability to use anything except a verifiable name. In fact, YouTube now shows a prompt every so often that asks people if want to use their real name. Actually, “asks” isn’t the right word, because there isn’t even an option to click “no”; you must hit a button that says you’ll “think about it later” in order for the message to go away. Google claims that it is a way to potentially deter people from making obscene, rude, or hateful comments. While this may sound nice in theory, the ability to post anonymously is also one of the best features the internet has to offer.

I did a little bit of research on the subject of anonymity and came across a definition posted on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s website. The page is mostly descriptive, but I found this passage to be particularly striking: “[the] long-standing rights to anonymity and the protections it affords are critically important for the Internet. As the Supreme Court has recognized the Internet offers a new and powerful democratic forum in which anyone can become a ‘pamphleteer’ or ‘a town crier with a voice that resonates farther than it could from any soapbox.’” Our ability to converse anonymously on the internet is extremely important because it PROMOTES openness. People are able to share and converse with ease, knowing that their voice is virtually disconnected from any living body. If the internet were to suddenly turn upside down and require individuals to use their real names or revealing titles, entire networks and forums would collapse. The open communities that Brand references in Turner’s book would cease to operate due to the inability to share with mental ease. Millions of people would also find themselves in legal trouble, since their Pirate Bay accounts and other forms of Torrenting usernames would be connected back to them.

The ramifications of the removal of anonymity are endless. The main point is that being able to post and share on the internet is a gift that, while safe for now, is something that the public must fight for if they want to continue operating under aliases (yes, I know that last word sounds a bit sketchy; I’m just tired of saying “anonymous”).

I know Professor Rosatelli said we’d be talking about 4Chan later on in the semester, so I may be jumping the gun with this video. However, I think it’s an excellent TED talk that reveals the pros and cons of anonymity by using 4Chan as an example. It’s incredibly funny, and for those of you who don’t know what the website is, this should be eye-opening.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_1UEAGCo30

By: Andrew Jones


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Paradoxical Power of the Internet

// Posted by Vicky on 01/20/2013 (7:29 PM)

The Internet in Society: Empowering or Censoring Citizens? (video)

Professor Rosatelli tweeted a link to an RSA Animate adapted from Evgeny Morozov’s talk on the internet in society. The video exposes myths about the freedom and transformative power of technology – specifically the… Read more

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The Internet in Society: Empowering or Censoring Citizens? (video)

Professor Rosatelli tweeted a link to an RSA Animate adapted from Evgeny Morozov’s talk on the internet in society. The video exposes myths about the freedom and transformative power of technology – specifically the internet. Morozov agrees that the internet and connectivity can promote reform, change and ultimately democracy but he argues that people ignore the fact that the internet is also a place that dictators and authoritarian governments can for their own benefit. He calls us to consider the intended uses of technology v. the actual uses of technology.

This video led me back to this week’s class reading on “The Shifting Politics of the Computational Metaphor”. The chapter gives a history on the paradoxical power of the internet and technology; Free Speech Movement thinkers such as Dyson and Barlow believed that technology empowered the people and was an outlet to overthrow bureaucracy even though it was simultaneously being used by the Government for purposes of military command and control. Turner poses an important question: “How was is that the informational economy came to be seen not as an oppressive force, but as a site of political and cultural change?” (16).

This issue of the paradox of the internet (and technology as a whole) is still ongoing as we see authoritarian governments, such as China, not only censoring the internet but using the internet for their own propaganda. China is currently paying people, often referred to as “50 cent armies”, to put out pro-government messages and create anti-democracy bots. So what does this mean for the future of the internet? Is it really a source of social change or is it being used for more bad than good? When looking not just at how politics have polluted the internet but how social and digital media outlets have been used to bully and promote negative lifestyles, I believe that there were high hopes and aspirations for the internet but that the reality of it isn’t as positive or pretty as we had intended.

sources:

Turner, From Counterculture to Cyberculture

http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2012/12/31/twitter_bots_for_democracy_could_combat_authoritarian_governments_50_cent.html


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Who are you?

// Posted by Jorien on 01/20/2013 (5:20 PM)

In a course that I took, called Cultural Studies, we had to read articles about shaping one’s identity. One of the articles talked about how social media, for example Facebook, on one hand helps to shape or improve your own… Read more

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In a course that I took, called Cultural Studies, we had to read articles about shaping one’s identity. One of the articles talked about how social media, for example Facebook, on one hand helps to shape or improve your own identity but also to create a new identity.

The show ‘Catfish: the TV show’(MTV) reminded me of this topic. The show is about online relationships between people who met each other via Facebook. The question remains whether the person that one has been talking to is the person he says he is or whether he made up a fake profile on Facebook.

Personally, I think it is interesting to see how social media influences the way people think about themselves, not only that, it also makes people want to be a certain way.  In the show, the reason that some of the people have a fake profile is that they are not happy with the way they look and they use someone else’s photo as their own. This shows that nowadays our society is really focused on looks, every advertisement you see will have ‘beautiful’ people in it, which most of the time means thin and flawless skin.

Every person is different. However, with Facebook it is possible to create a person that is more attractive, in looks but also in personality. The argument of the article that I read was that most people who create a profile want to be likeable. Even though they use their own name, pictures and interests. Most of the people do not post every picture; embarrasing pictures will often be left out. Also, petpeeves or interests that are uncommon, will probably not be posted on Facebook.
Why do people not show their whole personality? Are they not pleased with how they are?

An answer to that question will have something to do with the fact that you do not have to show everything about yourself, you could only post the good characteristics and the common interests. This makes people in a way ‘improve’ who they are. Often, people find it easier to talk online, since one does not have to respond immediately and one does not see the reaction of the other person. Since social media is used by many people, there is a big chance of talking to a fake profile; someone who pretends to be a certain way.

Do you think people show their true selves on Facebook?

If not,  should they?

A fun little video about this topic:

Is Facebook Changing Our Identity?


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Need a lyft?

// Posted by Celia on 01/18/2013 (10:58 PM)

As cities become increasingly crowded, finding taxis and getting around can be quite a task. Especially if you do not have a car of your own. Now, thanks to a few startups, navigating cities has become easier and more pleasant.… Read more

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As cities become increasingly crowded, finding taxis and getting around can be quite a task. Especially if you do not have a car of your own. Now, thanks to a few startups, navigating cities has become easier and more pleasant. Just look at the Lyft service in San Francisco. Founded on the platform of friendliness, Lyft offers a ride with a smile that is supposed to be an experience that parallels a “friend with a car on demand.” (Lawler, 2012) In order to become a Lyft user, you must download the app. The app works with GPS in the drivers phone to trace the cars and find a lyft near you. You can then request the car to bring you from point A to point B. Another service similar to Lyft is Uber, which started in San Francisco also but has moved to Boston, New York, Washington DC and more. Uber is slightly more luxurious and offers cars with the town-car/limousine effect. Lyft offers a rate similar (and sometimes cheaper) to hailing a cab, while Uber’s prices equate to about a cab and a half. Both are iPhone operated and working on Android apps. Uber faced backlash from city governments that argued against using GPS as a commercial mechanism as well as stating that the cars are not licensed cabs. Some critics claim that because the drivers are unlicensed, the user is at a higher risk. The truth is though, that the services use a multi-step, intensive background check to scan and test its drivers. In every city so far, the controversy has settled and Uber deemed officially legal.

With new startups like Lyft and Uber changing the way people move around cities, what will happen to the yellow taxis of New York City? Will there still be a need? As the app-run car companies become more popular, the influence on the existing street cab economy is unclear. Lyft and Uber offer more personal relationships with drivers and each user and driver has the chance to rate the other on experience, friendliness, cleanliness and more. This rating is then used for your profile and for example, someone with a higher score is more likely to get picked up than someone with a lower score. Convenience is a key factor; users have existing accounts, making the transaction cash/credit card free because the fee is just added to the account. People will theoretically no longer need to wait in the rain for a car, or run to the ATM to be sure to have cash for a cab. These small conveniences make a meaningful difference to a lot of users.

In my personal experience, both of these services have come in extremely useful in different situations. While Uber’s service is somewhat pricey in comparison to a normal taxi, I was able to get a car right outside of Grand Central Terminal in NYC around the holidays, a feat that is nearly impossible. In San Francisco, I took the Lyft service multiple times because street taxis were few and far between. In every instance, the driver was friendly and chatty. One driver even offered beverage and snack services! My experience with both services was more pleasant than an average taxi service and I would endorse both of them (if you’re willing to spend the extra dollars on Uber). It will be interesting to see how the industry of app-operated taxi service expands over the next couple years and how that growth influences street taxis.

Sources:

http://techcrunch.com/2012/08/25/lyft-san-francisco-launch/

http://www.wired.com/business/2012/08/uber/?utm_source=Contextly&utm_medium=RelatedLinks&utm_campaign=Previous


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Safer than hiding it under the floorboards…

// Posted by Sam on 01/17/2013 (11:24 AM)

Let’s play with some verbal association: when you hear the word “bank,” what comes to mind?

For me, its pretty easy: I see a heavy, stately two-story stone building with four granite doric columns and intricate stonework above the thick… Read more

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Let’s play with some verbal association: when you hear the word “bank,” what comes to mind?

For me, its pretty easy: I see a heavy, stately two-story stone building with four granite doric columns and intricate stonework above the thick brass doors. The facade might have an inscription like “FIRST NATIONAL RESERVE” and have V’s instead of U’s–you know what I mean. According to the Mostly Economics blog, “The architecture is not merely about aesthetics, of course; banks are designed to convey strength, stability, and security to would-be depositors.”  The form of a bank has always fit its function: back in the day, they were built to embody the ideas of strength, integrity, and security. People wanted brick-and-mortar assurance that their money was in good hands. Apparently, that mode of thinking has been completely phased out…

Today, more banking happens online than in person. Aside from just commercial markets, indexes, and global trading, more and more personal banking is happening in cyberspace. It’d be difficult to find a major bank today that does not offer an iPhone app to “bank on the go.” This author alone has made use of Citizens, Citibank, and Wells Fargo apps. These apps, however, are more like extensions of physical branches rather than self-sustaining online banks.

Here’s a video demonstration of the GoBank app:

According to Wired magazine, the banking industry has evolved even further to include GoBank, a “new bank that has no branches, just an app.” (Wohlsen) The article details a new venture by Green Dot, the popular prepaid debit card company that is popular among those with no bank account, to create a completely online bank that is accessible only through the app. “Our bank was created from scratch,” Green Dot founder and CEO Steve Streit said at GoBank’s San Francisco unveiling. “It’s not a mobile app that was bolted onto an online version of a brick-and-mortar bank…the GoBank app offers all the features and services expected of a 21st-century checking account, from paying bills to checking balances to depositing checks by smartphone camera. But Green Dot hopes GoBank’s single-minded focus on the mobile user experience will peel away customers who manage most of their day-to-day lives through their phones and are tired of waiting for their current banks to catch up with that idea.” Sam Altman, Green Dot’s VP of mobile services, says the market for the app, which is comprised mostly of people under 40 who have an iPhone or Droid and are dissatisfied with their bank, is larger than one may think.

So, is GoBank a good idea? Are there any serious societal implications that we can extrapolate from people using GoBank? Will people start switching their banking to a completely online service or simply use it along with their existing bank accounts? Do you trust cybersecurity enough to invest your entire paycheck into an exclusively online bank? The economy has always been intangible, a figment of the imagination necessary to make the world turn…

 

Sources

http://www.wired.com/business/2013/01/go-bank-pay-what-you-want/

http://mostlyeconomics.wordpress.com/2011/11/22/history-of-commercial-bank-architecture-design/


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